griseus:

94% OF SHEARWATERS FROM CATALAN COAST HAVE PLASTIC IN THEIR STOMACH

 Floating plastic debris is usually ingested by marine animals by mistake or because plastic fragments resemble their natural food items. Some plastics can release potentially toxic substances  or become vectors for dispersing harmful algae and alien species. Moreover, plastics can produce entanglement, intoxication, internal wounds, digestive tract blockage and ulcers among other affections . Therefore, there is an urgent need to assess the interactions between plastic debris and marine life.
All birds in a recent study were accidentally caught by longliners operating throughout the Catalan coast (Western Mediterranean Sea) between  2003 and 2010, and according to spanish scientists, 66% of seabirds have ingested at least one piece of plastic. In case of Cory’s shearwater (Calonectris diomedea) 94% of them ate  plastics (with an average of fifteen fragments per individual). As for the  Balearic shearwater (Puffinus mauretanicus) and Yelkouan Shearwater (Puffinus yelkouan), the percentage of birds affected is 70%. A high rate.
The chicks of seabirds are most vulnerable to ingestion of plastic because they can not regurgitate food as adults do.

Reference (Open Access):  Militão et al. 2013. “Plastic debris in Mediterranean seabirds” Marine Pollution Bulletin.
Photo: EOL

griseus:

94% OF SHEARWATERS FROM CATALAN COAST HAVE PLASTIC IN THEIR STOMACH

 Floating plastic debris is usually ingested by marine animals by mistake or because plastic fragments resemble their natural food items. Some plastics can release potentially toxic substances  or become vectors for dispersing harmful algae and alien species. Moreover, plastics can produce entanglement, intoxication, internal wounds, digestive tract blockage and ulcers among other affections . Therefore, there is an urgent need to assess the interactions between plastic debris and marine life.

All birds in a recent study were accidentally caught by longliners operating throughout the Catalan coast (Western Mediterranean Sea) between  2003 and 2010, and according to spanish scientists, 66% of seabirds have ingested at least one piece of plastic. In case of Cory’s shearwater (Calonectris diomedea94% of them ate  plastics (with an average of fifteen fragments per individual). As for the  Balearic shearwater (Puffinus mauretanicus) and Yelkouan Shearwater (Puffinus yelkouan), the percentage of birds affected is 70%. A high rate.

The chicks of seabirds are most vulnerable to ingestion of plastic because they can not regurgitate food as adults do.

aquariaporn:

underthevastblueseas:

The basking shark is the world’s second-largest fish. In summer, it swims open-mouthed at the surface, filtering out plankton. Every hour, the basking shark passes up to 395,000 gallons (1.5 million liters) of seawater through the huge gills that almost encircle its head. Its liver runs the length of the abdominal cavity and is filled with oil to aid buoyancy. They grow up to lengths of  20–36 ft (6–11 m).

via // video source

"roooar, I’m a shark"

low-techtank:

montereybayaquarium:

Life is good for ocean sunfish in our million-gallon Open Sea exhibit. Our most recent inhabitant grew so large (386 pounds) that we released it into Monterey Bay, with a satellite tag that will help us learn more about mola behavior in the wild. And don’t worry: we have a new, smaller one on exhibit!

Watch us release an ocean sunfish in this video!

BE FREEE

goodbye michaelangelo

unexplained-events:

Megamouth

No one knew of this shark’s existence until 1976. They are rarely seen in shallow water. There have only been three known recordings and fifty-nine specimen sightings of this shark as of May, 2014.

(via operationjaws)

thingsofthewild:

sharkhugger:

Via theaustralian.com: Jaws wasn’t a psychopath but just having a bad day says new study
The study found that some sharks were more sociable, bunching together, while others appeared actively to distance themselves. The “loner” sharks appeared to rely on a different strategy for survival, tending to seek out spots in the tank where they could camouflage themselves by matching their skin colour with the gravel on the tank’s floor.
The study found that sociable sharks had “friends” with whom they preferred to spend time, which the authors said was a sign that sharks are mentally complex. “They can form social groups and are capable of remembering other individuals,” Dr Jacoby said.

Guys. Sharks have individual personalities that affect how they socialize with one another. Do you know how rad this is?

thingsofthewild:

sharkhugger:

Via theaustralian.comJaws wasn’t a psychopath but just having a bad day says new study

The study found that some sharks were more sociable, bunching together, while others appeared actively to distance themselves. The “loner” sharks appeared to rely on a different strategy for survival, tending to seek out spots in the tank where they could camouflage themselves by matching their skin colour with the gravel on the tank’s floor.

The study found that sociable sharks had “friends” with whom they preferred to spend time, which the authors said was a sign that sharks are mentally complex. “They can form social groups and are capable of remembering other individuals,” Dr Jacoby said.

Guys. Sharks have individual personalities that affect how they socialize with one another. Do you know how rad this is?

phoenixrevives:

I legitimately saw someone say “a gallon is excessive for one betta”

ONE GALLON

EXCESSIVE

Excuse me sir while I lock you in your closet because yOUR HOUSE IS EXCESSIVE

WHY WOULD YOU NEED A WHOLE HOUSE WHEN YOURE JUST A TINY MAN

Asswipe.

(via kai-ni)

corporisfabrica:

Coronal and ventral x-rays of the hammerhead shark, Sphyrna mokarran.

The distinguishing feature of this animal is, of course, the highly unusual skull shape. You may once have wondered what exactly this seemingly clumsy structure contributes to this fearsome predator, and biologists still do. However, a number of theories exist to explain this unique adaptation; here are some of the best:

  1. All the better to see you with: mounting the eyes at either end of the broad skull allows excellent vision in all areas of the vertical plane. Hammerhead sharks, as hunters of bottom-dwelling animals, can use this superior angle of vision to better locate prey. 
  2. Another pair of fins. The head has evolved into the shape of an effective hydrofoil. It is thought that this may provide greater stability to the shark when making sharp turns and hunting.
  3. Heartbeat sensor. Like many sharks, the hammerhead possesses specialised electrosensory organs called the ampullae of Lorenzini. With these, it can detect the magnetic activity of the Earth and find its heading by means of biological compass. Much more impressively, the hammerhead can detect the minuscule electrical activity emitted by the muscle contractions of its prey, allowing location even when hidden from sight. Almost like a skull-mounted metal detector, the shark may sweep the seabed. All it takes is a heartbeat to give the game away. 

Photo credit to Dan Anderson.

(via a-marine-biologist)

Reblog with how many pets you have!

low-techtank:

wiebasaurusrex:

aquasplendens:

mommarowen:

lilfoxtrot:

andthentherewasarat:

3milysrats:

I’m suddenly curious to know :D

11 rats 1 mouse = 12

36! 5 dogs 2 cats 12 rats (including the 2 from
furrsonalitypets
and
many-splendored-rat
2 mice (including 1 from

2 betta and 1 crested gecko!

2 betta, 2 axolotls, 1 mystery snail, 6 platys, 2 nerites snails, 6 Amano shrimp and cat

4 cats, 2 retrievers, 1 male betta, 5 female betta, 2 bn plecos, 2 ADFs, 6 blushing whiteskirt tetras, 1 dwarf gourami, and 8 ghost shrimp so thats 31?